This is why Putin spoke about Finland: “It happened the other way”

A senior analyst at the Institute for Foreign Policy assessed the Russian president's speech as unsurprising.

Vladimir Putin made a striking assessment of Russia's vulnerability in his speech. Reuters

Russian President Vladimir Putin firmly believes in the importance of war drumming for his own position.

That's what a senior analyst at the Institute for Foreign Policy thinks Jussie LassilaAccordingly, Putin's speech, which lasted more than two hours on Thursday, was not surprising.

– He says that when Putin's presidential campaign was launched, the idea in the presidential administration was to emphasize Putin's achievements and how things have gone in the best direction.

The presidential administration would have liked to suppress the war policy because it did not arouse great feelings among the people. According to Lassila, Putin's speech shows that the president has the opposite opinion.

– Putin likes to drum up its necessity. In this sense, he shows again that war is an obsession for him, he says.

In the speech, Lasila drew attention to how Putin's arrogance about Western aid to Ukraine was conspicuous by their absence. In this sense, aid to Ukraine can be considered effective, although in many ways insufficient.

– Putin previously disparaged the West and appeared confident, but now there was more aggression and a certain defensiveness when he said that the West was going to destroy Russia, Lassila says.

At this point, Putin has been surprisingly candid about what kind of opportunity the West has in the long run. According to Lassila, Putin dropped a note that drew attention to the weapon that contributed to the fall of the Soviet Union.

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– That's a very important point, he says, that by helping Ukraine and preparing itself, the West has the opportunity to militarily combat Putin's imperialism, which is pushing Russia into a deep military economy.

– Putin later hinted that Russia's fate would be similar to that of the Soviet Union. It's a right-wing assessment that Putin doesn't usually make. So Putin admitted that if Russia hangs on to the war economy, it cannot win that game with the West.

Putin's comment suggests that Russia's equipment costs are at unsustainable rock bottoms. According to Lasila's explanation, Putin implied this, but “clearly enough”.

Jussi Lassila is a senior researcher at the Foreign Policy Institute. Pete Anikari

Finland mentioned

On Wednesday, Lasila predicted to Iltalethi that Finland would not be mentioned in Putin's speech. However, Putin unexpectedly brought in the NATO members of Finland and Sweden, who indicated that the Western military circle should be strengthened.

In terms of content, Putin's comment on Finland is a reiteration of the old. Lassila recalls that the NATO membership of Finland and Sweden was one of the most significant losses in Russia's strategy.

– In addition to security, I see the NATO membership of Finland and Sweden as a strategic defeat for Russia. That is the greatest value here, he says.

– That is, when Putin used the enlargement of NATO as a basis for action in Ukraine, ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ that it will give him more influence, ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

By addressing this issue, Putin can once again position Russia as a victim and explain the arming behind the Finnish border. However, Russia cannot do anything concrete in the near future.

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– Russian resources are still tied up in the Ukraine operation. Realistically, this won't change very quickly, says Lassila.

– However, Putin wants to highlight the fact that Russia needs to defend itself from a victimized and aggressive West. The NATO membership of Finland and Sweden is proof of this.

President Sauli Niinisto commented on Putin's speech. Henry Carcainan

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